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Chip-stealing seagull and ‘big fox’ calls prompt 999 warning

SeagullImage copyright Reuters
Image caption One caller dialled 999 once they have been focused by means of a chip-thieving seagull

Calls a few “big fox”, a disobedient cat and a chip-stealing seagull have brought about police to warn other folks to not misuse the 999 carrier.

Nottinghamshire Police mentioned useless calls have been delaying name handlers from coping with actual emergencies.

Other frivolous inquiries come with any individual in need of to understand the time of the following teach and every other suffering to get a settee out in their area.

Officers mentioned they have been disillusioned earlier warnings were overlooked.

The pressure incessantly stocks main points on social media of the silliest 999 calls it has won to check out to discourage timewasters.

Despite this one particular person referred to as to document a large fox of their lawn and every other rang to whinge a seagull had stolen their chips.

Image copyright Nottinghamshire Police
Image caption The pressure incessantly stocks main points of foolish 999 calls it has won

Other calls during the last few weeks have concerned a cat refusing to go back from a neighbour’s lawn and a client who used to be denied a reimbursement after purchasing the flawed dimension shampoo.

Another caller sought after touch main points for police in Cyprus after misplacing their provisional using licence on vacation, whilst any individual else referred to as in need of to understand the time of the following teach.

Supt Paul Burrows mentioned: “Despite the paintings we incessantly do within the media, on-line and over the telephone to give an explanation for to other folks how you can use 999 responsibly, we do nonetheless obtain a top collection of out of place calls to our emergency quantity.

“Every out of place name our emergency name handlers obtain has the prospective to extend us from responding to authentic emergencies.”

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