Incredibly rare ancient map of London is discovered from 1572 – and the roads are the same

A particularly rare instance of the earliest surviving map of London has been discovered.

The 1572 metropolis plan, by engraver Frans Hogenburg, gives an enchanting fowl’s eye view of the underdeveloped capital metropolis.

It reveals there was a big settlement north of the River Thames, however south of it was sparsely populated.

The colorful map depicts many boats weaving their approach down the river, which might solely be crossed by the solitary Outdated London Bridge.

Recognisable landmarks embody the Tower of London, the Charterhouse monastery and the previous St Paul’s Cathedral, whereas Westminster is marked as ‘West Mester’.

In a nod to a bygone age, bear baiting is proven in Southwark, and there are drawings of Queen Elizabeth figures round the map’s edges.

BNPS.co.uk (01202 558833) Pic: AtleaGallery/BNPS An extremely rare example of the earliest surviving map of London has emerged for sale for ??11,000. The 1572 city plan by engraver Frans Hogenburg provides a fascinating bird's eye view of the nation's capital. It reveals there was a large settlement north of the Thames, but south of it was very sparsely populated. There are drawings of many boats weaving their way down the river, which could only be crossed by the Old London Bridge.
The map exhibits little life to the south of the river, however the metropolis is already full of winding streets (Image: BNPS)
BNPS.co.uk (01202 558833) Pic: AtleaGallery/BNPS An extremely rare example of the earliest surviving map of London has emerged for sale for ??11,000. The 1572 city plan by engraver Frans Hogenburg provides a fascinating bird's eye view of the nation's capital. It reveals there was a large settlement north of the Thames, but south of it was very sparsely populated. There are drawings of many boats weaving their way down the river, which could only be crossed by the Old London Bridge.
The Tower of London has water in its moat and leads onto open grassland the place there are now enormous buildings (Image: BNPS)

The map captures London in a approach similar to how William Shakespeare would have recognized it: a cosmopolitan metropolis of about 100,000 folks whose ranks included royalty, the Aristocracy, retailers, artisans, labourers, thieves and beggars.

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Dutch, Belgian and German merchants established themselves there as they sought to take benefit of the budding financial system.

The map was commissioned by the retailers of the Hanseatic League, who had important business pursuits in England.

They benefited from tax and customs concessions on wool and completed fabric, permitting them to regulate that commerce.

BNPS.co.uk (01202 558833) Pic: AtleaGallery/BNPS An extremely rare example of the earliest surviving map of London has emerged for sale for ??11,000. The 1572 city plan by engraver Frans Hogenburg provides a fascinating bird's eye view of the nation's capital. It reveals there was a large settlement north of the Thames, but south of it was very sparsely populated. There are drawings of many boats weaving their way down the river, which could only be crossed by the Old London Bridge.
St Paul’s Cathedral had a spire earlier than the Nice Hearth of London destroyed it practically 100 years after the map was drawn (Image: BNPS)
BNPS.co.uk (01202 558833) Pic: AtleaGallery/BNPS An extremely rare example of the earliest surviving map of London has emerged for sale for ??11,000. The 1572 city plan by engraver Frans Hogenburg provides a fascinating bird's eye view of the nation's capital. It reveals there was a large settlement north of the Thames, but south of it was very sparsely populated. There are drawings of many boats weaving their way down the river, which could only be crossed by the Old London Bridge.
Westminster Palace is barely recognisable, however it’s there subsequent to the busy dock and Westminster Cathedral is seen to the left (Image: BNPS)

Their base in London was the Steelyard, which is now the website of Cannon Avenue station.

The 13ins by 19ins map, which was printed in Cologne, Germany, is being offered by Atlea Gallery, an vintage map seller in London, at an upcoming rare books truthful.

It is valued at £11,000.

Tom Visitor, of Atlea Gallery, stated: ‘This is the earliest accessible printed map of London, right here proven in the elusive first state.

‘It is fascinating to see how small London was in 1572, especially south of the river, but the large number of boats give an indication of the importance of the city.’

The Firsts London rare books truthful takes place in Battersea, south west London, from Friday to Sunday.

BNPS.co.uk (01202 558833) Pic: AtleaGallery/BNPS An extremely rare example of the earliest surviving map of London has emerged for sale for ??11,000. The 1572 city plan by engraver Frans Hogenburg provides a fascinating bird's eye view of the nation's capital. It reveals there was a large settlement north of the Thames, but south of it was very sparsely populated. There are drawings of many boats weaving their way down the river, which could only be crossed by the Old London Bridge.
Charing Cross seems to the backside left – a lot of the grass to the north east of it is now Trafalgar Sq. (Image: BNPS)

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